Life, Memorial Day, Memorial Day: Remembering the Sacrifices, Passion

Memorial Day: Remembering the Sacrifices

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I know Memorial Day was yesterday, but one day a year is not enough to remember those who have fallen in protecting our country. This reality is never far from my mind with a husband who served in the military for twenty years, and with many other family members and friends who served or are serving still.

No one knows the number of days allotted to them. For the brave men and women who serve, this seems even more true. When they deploy to other parts of the world—especially those where fighting is the daily MO (modus operandi)—they don’t know what each day holds. They hope to see family again, but they go forth, knowing there’s no guarantee they’ll make it home.

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For the spouses, children and extended families left behind, the uncertainty can eat away at the sense of peace, of security. Yet, they release their loved ones to fulfill the commitment they agreed to.

How many men and women knew when they awoke on the morning of December 7, 1941, that this sunny morning would be their last? By the end of that day, over 2,300 soldiers lost their lives.

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What about the thousands of soldiers who died in the Korean and Viet Nam wars? Many of them completed their missions bravely, and sometimes without the support of the country they vowed to protect.

These men and women are worth remembering and honoring. 

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Those who fight current battles on our country’s behalf don’t know if their eyes will see nightfall or tomorrow’s sunrise. Yet, they bravely fulfill what they’ve committed to do, to protect our values and beliefs.

I am beyond thankful for the men and women who protect the freedoms we enjoy. My heart grieves when I read of or hear about soldiers who have died in the line of duty. I ache for family members left behind, and the gap opened in hearts and lives because of those deaths.

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The men and women who serve in the armed forces and as paramilitary contractors for our country deserve our thanks, our honor and our respect. Their family members deserve our fervent gratitude.

And for those we remember on Memorial Day, they deserve the day because they paid the ultimate price—their lives.

May we always remember.

What about you? Who do you remember on Memorial Day? How do you usually spend Memorial day?

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7 thoughts on “Memorial Day: Remembering the Sacrifices”

  1. After church Sunday we took the grandkids to Ft Logan National Cemetery to give them the experience of ‘seeing’ the sea of gravestones, so they can begin to get a feel of how many have sacrificed their lives for our freedoms. It was a reverent time and they appreciated it. Thankful.

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    1. I agree, Lisa. Choosing to lay your life on the line requires a special kind of courage. It is difficult to see/hear of young lives cut tragically short. I’m glad your grandfather had stories to tell of his brother.

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  2. Gorgeous pictures, Jeanne. Really gorgeous. On Memorial Day, I remember my grandfather. He didn’t die in WWII, but he was severely wounded. Shot in the shoulder. His heart was weakened from that event. It was an honor to stand over the USS Arizona so many years ago. And I was so disappointed that the memorials were closed down when we took our trip to DC.

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    1. I’m glad your grandfather lived through the war. I’m sorry for the life long injuries he lives (d?) with.

      We took our boys to the USS Arizona a couple years ago. I believe every American should visit it at least once to better understand all that happened that day. And if you ever get the chance to go back to DC, do visit the memorials. The WW2 one really touched me.

      Thanks for stopping by my friend!

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